Built in 1928, the Robin to its’ advantage, was similar to the popular Spirit of Saint Louis.

Curtiss used the OX-5 engine and with over 300 Robins in the air, saw the need for the greater horsepower Challenger engine as well as a seaplane version.

By 1930 over 700 Robins were built, at a rate of about 17 per week, and Robins were a familiar sight at airports around the country. The C-1 carried 50 gallons of fuel for a range of 510 miles or 5 hours of flight.

In 1929, the “St Louis Robin” set the endurance record of 420 hours, 21 minutes, almost 18 days by refueling in flight.  Dale Jackson, the chief test pilot at Curtiss Airplane, and Forrest O’Brine won the prize money of $31,225.00, plus gifts and a $2,470.00 bonus for the 247 hours added to the previous record of 173 hours.

In 1933 after the Stock Market crash, thirty-one year old “Wrong Way Corrigan” purchased a Robin for $325.00.   Flying to Ireland without permission, he used the “I flew the wrong way” story that brought him instant acclaim.

DISPLAY STATUS COUNTRY OF ORIGIN CURRENT LOCATION
 Own  United States  Legends Hangar
PURPOSE & TYPE MATERIALS ERA & DATE RANGE
 Transport Steel Golden Age
1918 – 1939
PRODUCTION &
ACQUISITION
SPECIFICATIONS SERVICE HISTORY
MFG: Curtiss-Robertson
First Produced: 1928
Number Built: 769
Armament: NoneAcquired by Yanks in 1985.

Restoration completed in 2003.

Wingspan: 41 ft
Wing Area: 243 sq ft
Length: 24 ft 1 in
Height: 8 ft
Empty Weight: 1,638 lbs
Gross Weight: 2,600 lbs
Powerplant: R-600 Challenger
Thrust:
Cruise Speed: 102 mph
Maximum Speed: 120 mph
Range: 510 miles